Cheap Travel Insurance For People With A Tumour

WWW.TRAVELINSURANCETUMOUR.CO.UK

With a tumour you really should take travel insurance out when you go on holiday or travel abroad just in case you fall ill and need medical treatment as the NHS will not provide treatment whilst you are on holiday. The cost of receiving medical treatment outside the UK can be very expensive and the travel insurance will repay most of these costs provided you took it out before you left for your holiday.

In addition if you need assistance to get home, like an ambulance or medical staff to accompany you, then the travel insurance will pay for the costs associated with repatriation too.

For those with pre-existing medical conditions travel insurance can be expensive unless you shop around (this link might help you find cheap travel insurance for people with a tumour).

Travellers with a tumour have in the past paid significantly more for their travel insurance as those with tumour, like many other sufferers of a pre-existing condition have had their premiums raised. The travel insurance companies consider those that are under the treatment of a doctor, even on a routine basis, may be more likely to claim and hence cause them to have to pay out.

Additional rating factors which effect travel insurance are connected conditions and whether this condition has caused you to cut short or cancel a holiday in the past.

Tumour and travel insurance

Neoplasm or tumor is an abnormal mass of tissue as a result of abnormal growth or division of cells. Prior to abnormal growth (known as neoplasia), cells often undergo an abnormal pattern of growth, such as metaplasia or dysplasia. However, metaplasia or dysplasia do not always progress to neoplasia. The growth of neoplastic cells exceeds, and is not coordinated with, that of the normal tissues around it. The growth persists in the same excessive manner even after cessation of the stimuli. It usually causes a lump or tumor. Neoplasms may be benign, pre-malignant (carcinoma in situ) or malignant (cancer).

In modern medicine, the term tumor means a neoplasm that has formed a lump. In the past, the term tumor was used differently. Some neoplasms do not cause a lump. Cancer is a form of malignant neoplasm.

Types A neoplasm can be benign, potentially malignant (pre-cancer), or malignant (cancer).

  • Benign neoplasms include uterine fibroids and melanocytic nevi (skin moles). They are circumscribed and localised and do not transform into cancer.
  • Potentially malignant neoplasms include carcinoma in situ. They do not invade and destroy but, given enough time, will transform into a cancer.
  • Malignant neoplasms are commonly called cancer. They invade and destroy the surrounding tissue, may form metastases and eventually kill the host.
  • Secondary neoplasm refers to any of a class of cancerous tumor that is either a metastatic offshoot of a primary tumor, or an apparently unrelated tumor that increases in frequency following certain cancer treatments such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy.
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    All of these factors will be taken into account when you apply for travel insurance with tumour.

    In addition, those that are waiting for a diagnosis or additional tests face the highest premiums as what insurers’ hate most of all is uncertainty, especially around the possible risk of falling ill abroad with a condition that isn’t yet well controlled.